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Sex Trafficking in the United States - Eden

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This article features a number of observations and suggestions from leading anti-trafficking organizations and providers of services to victims & survivors, on which areas of the battle front are still lacking in terms of accurate data collection and analysis, public and private funding, general overall support, and adecuate provision, dissemination, and distribution of appropriate information and necessary services. The entries will be cataloged in random and uncategorized fashion.

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“Data collection on human trafficking needs improvement. Existing statistics on human trafficking are only capturing a small picture of the problem. Until we have learned to identify all victims of human trafficking, statistics will not be reflective of the full spectrum of victims, including victims who are transgender; male and female; citizens and foreign nationals; adults and children; sex- and labor-trafficked; free and still in bondage.”Freedom Network

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“Include quality and impact in the evaluation of responses to human trafficking survivors. So often the focus is on the number of victims identified and how many people become certified 20 “Include quality and impact in the evaluation of responses to human trafficking survivors. So often the focus is on the number of victims identified and how many people become certified “Include quality and impact in the evaluation of responses to human trafficking survivors. So often the focus is on the number of victims identified and how many people become certified or employed. Qualitative research is necessary to adequately assess other important measures of success (e.g., survivors’ improved feelings of safety and well being; preparedness to enter the job market; increased engagement in one’s community).” -– Northern Tier Anti-Trafficking Consortium

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“Coordination among federal agencies on funding is vital to expanding anti-human trafficking efforts. Lack of funding is often cited as a challenge to trafficking investigations and services, which go hand in hand. Creative or additional means of funding should be sought. Solicitations for joint grants should be concise and reviewed carefully for contradictory requirements.”Indiana Office of the Attorney General

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“An important aspect of coordination and collaboration between agencies should be the development of a standardized training for agencies—one that is based on a uniform definition of human trafficking and then adapted to the specialized needs of each agency. Standardized trainings will help create more cohesion and unity between agencies.” — Coalition to Abolish Slavery and Trafficking

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“Training to increase collaboration with domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking agencies should include education on the intersections of these issues with human trafficking and provision of services to human trafficking victims. Many of these agencies are already serving trafficking victims but need to feel incorporated into the anti-trafficking field not just as ‘related fields’ but as fields that have direct intersections with human trafficking and are filling the gaps in service provision throughout the country.”Denver Anti-Trafficking Alliance, Denver District Attorney’s Office

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“The public benefits available to a human trafficking victim may vary on a case-by-case basis. Due to the complexities in meeting the eligibility requirements for these programs, victims are generally unable to obtain public benefits on their own. Legal aid providers and victim services agencies help trafficking victims access public benefits and meet their basic survival needs, but they often lack the funding and staff capacity to fully meet this need.” –- Santa Clara University Law School

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“Providing low barrier access to services and better identification of victims and survivors so they can access services is really the key to responding to human trafficking. Focusing on this gives us a more actionable plan than spreading ourselves too broadly.” –- International Rescue Committee Washington

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“One of the primary barriers we face as service providers is finding appropriate housing for survivors, especially transitional/emergency housing. Not having safe, affordable housing to turn to means that victims are more likely to stay in exploitative situations (because there is nowhere else to go), or be re-trafficked or otherwise unsafe. Even if we manage to find safe housing, there is a risk of wiping out their entire services fund to pay rent and not having enough left over for other basic needs.” –- Break the Chain Campaign

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Source(s):  Federal Strategic Action Plan on Services for Victims of Human Trafficking in the United States 2013-2017

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